Rare Porcelain Figure of a Child by J. Palin-Thorley, 1920s, depicting a naked child on a mound of fruit and foliage, incised mark J. Palin-Thorley and monogram towards the base, 7¼.“  

                            RPW00367                                                        Enquire

 

Ref – Chipstone.   Two published articles by John C. Austin, in Ceramics in America“J. Palin Thorley (1892-1987), Potter and Designer: Part I.”and “J. Palin Thorley (1892-1987), Potter and Designer: Part 2, Williamsburg.”

Joseph Palin-Thorley

The following information is taken from two published articles by John C. Austin, in Ceramics in America“J. Palin Thorley (1892-1987), Potter and Designer: Part I.”and “J. Palin Thorley (1892-1987), Potter and Designer: Part 2, Williamsburg.”

“Thorley was born in and of the Potteries. His ancestors on both sides worked in the field. His grandfather Joseph Thorley, who started what became the Hanley School of Art, had trained at Ridgeway, and his father, John Thorley, had trained under him.  Both were competent ceramic painters, which, one might assume, is why Palin was apprenticed in the painting department at Wedgwood.

At the age of ten, in 1902, along with his academic education, Thorley started studying art at the Hanley School of Art. Two years later he won firsts in drawing and other exams. In 1906 he started his apprenticeship at Wedgwood and continued as a journeyman and assistant to John E. Goodwin, head of the painting department, until he left to fight in the war. Although Thorley was apprenticed to the painting department at Wedgwood, he was given projects that taught him to design forms for dinnerware and the technique of lithophane. He must have learned the technique of pâte sur pâte during the short period after he left Wedgwood to work for Lawrence Birke, one of the best known producers of pâte sur pâte in England. Thorley had left Wedgwood due to the strict military way Sir Cecil Wedgwood was running the factory. Sir Cecil convinced him to return, shortly before he left for war. 

Thorley worked as art director at three major potteries—Simpsons, New Chelsea, and Charles Allerton and Sons—before emmigrating to the United States in 1927. “

Concentrating on Palin-Thorley’s figurative work, Austin goes on to explain that -

“Thorley was primarily a designer and potter of useful wares—tea and dinner services and vases.  The few figures he created were probably done for his own pleasure. How many he made is unknown, but in addition to the ones illustrated here and the chatelaine discussed previously ..  There are illustrations in the Thorley Papers of an elongated Chinese sage that Thorley might have created, as well as a seated cherub, which was sold at Christie's, New York (June 12, 1987, lot 42), and is said to bear Thorley's incised signature. “

“Thorley clearly was fond of the female form, as his papers contain many sketches—some elaborate, some just a few lines—of women, some classically drawn, while others were created with the free-flowing lines of art nouveau. “

Although speculation at this stage, having yet to find a copy of the Christie's, New York catalogue mentioned above, it would seem highly likely that the cherub seated on the mound of fruit is likely to be the same one or another similar as the lead figure . 

In the article Austin illustrates a “figure of a chatelaine in medieval dress (marked with a monogram and date as well as a script signature with a date all in blue) that was made during either Thorley’s last days at Simpsons or his early days as head of the art department at the New Chelsea Porcelain Co. It is most likely he created this on his own, not as part of the factory’s production, because both Simpsons and New Chelsea specialized in dinnerware, and because so few examples of this figure appear to have been made. Stories that Thorley made only three of them—one of which was admired by and thus given to Queen Mary— cannot be verified, although he (Palin) does say that the figure was admired by her. Thorley must have kept the mold, for a green (unfired) example, with head missing, was found in his studio in 1986.  A letter to him from a customer, dated December 8, 1971, states, “We are eagerly awaiting the Chatelaine figurine. It will be our most prized possession,” which indicates that he promised to produce one for a client at that late date. In the Thorley papers there is an early photograph of the chatelaine—which may or may not be this example—that has the unexplained date “1917” written on the back. “

In his article, Austin also illustrates three other figures, two of which are stated to be in the Tetrault Collection, one of a glazed but undecorated figure of a lady in eighteenth-century dress, with the Thorley stamp and the same figure in whiteware figure but unmarked, and an unglazed figure of a reclining nude, in earthenware, 10 inches long. 


English Studio Pottery Figure Group by Molly Mitchell-Smith, 1939, modeled as two female figures seated, a dog at their feet, incised mark, Molly Mitchell-Smith, London, England, 193' and Paper Label, Arts & Crafts exhibition label, USA & Canada, 8” high.

                            RPW00300                                                       Enquire         


Gwendolen Parnell Chelsea Cheyne Hand Modeled Figure Dancing, 1927, Gwendolen Parnell & Margaret Taylor, wearing a grey dress, dancing with one leg kicked up behind her, incised mark, Chelsea Cheyne, 1925 and M.T., on a wooden base, 7½" high.  Right hand three finger missing, damage to ribbon.

                         RW001259                                                                   Enquire               


William Ruscoe Porcelain Figure ‘Old Maid’, 1930s, hand rolled clay figure of a woman with a cat at her feet, impressed oval mark, Wm. Roscoe, England, inscribed in black Old Maid, 4¾”.            

                   RPW00258                                                                          Enquire

Provenance

Property from The Personal Collection of Shirley Temple Black.  Purchased from the Saint James Galleries Ltd, 19 East 53rd Street, New York. 


Puncinello.jpg

William Ruscoe Porcelain Figure ‘Punchinello’, 1930s, hand rolled clay figure of a clown, with pigmented clays, impressed oval mark, Wm, Ruscoe, England, incised in black, Punchinello, 4¾“.    Chip to collar.    

                       RPW00255                                                                         Enquire

Provenance

Property from The Personal Collection of Shirley Temple Black.  Purchased from the Saint James Galleries Ltd, 19 East 53rd Street, New York.


William Ruscoe Porcelain Group ‘Beer’, 1930s, hand rolled clay figure of a two men drinking at a table, impressed oval mark, Wm, Ruscoe, England, script Beer, 3¾“.    

                            RPW00356                                                     Enquire

 


Gwendolen Parnell Chelsea Cheyne Hand Modeled Figure Woman Ironing, 1925, by Gwendolen Parnell & Mary Lyall, wearing a cloth cap and apron ironing on a raised board on paving stones, incised mark, Chelsea Cheyne, 1925 and L, 6¾“ high.

 

                           RW001257                                                       Enquire


Gwendolen Parnell Chelsea Cheyne Hand Modeled Figure Woman Sweeping, 1925, Gwendolen Parnell & Mary Lyall, wearing a cloth cap and apron sweeping on paving stones, incised mark, Chelsea Cheyne, 1925 and L, 6¾“ high.

                                RW001258                                                      Enquire 


Gwendolen Parnell Chelsea Cheyne Hand Modeled Figure in 18th Century Dress, 1927, by Mary Lyall, of a woman wearing a cloth cap and exaggerated wide pink dress, arms crossed in front, on paving stones, wooden stand, incised 'Chelsea Cheyne,' '1927,' 'L' and 'M.L.' 7½".   

                               RW001255                                                        Enquire


RW1253 - William Ruscoe Group ‘Boxers’  - 1.jpg

William Ruscoe Group ‘Boxers’, 1930s, hand rolled clay with two figures on an oval base, pigmented clays and slip painted, impressed oval stamp, Wm, Ruscoe, England, 4¾“.

                          RW001253                                                          Enquire        


William Ruscoe Porcelain Figure ‘Shepherd’ & ‘Shepherdess’ 1930s, hand rolled clay figures with sheep, pigmented clays, oval stamped mark, Wm, Ruscoe, England, painted Shepherd & Shepherdess, 5½“.   Damage to her cloak

                               RPW00256                                                             $3,400

 

Provenance

Property from The Personal Collection of Shirley Temple Black.  Purchased from the Saint James Galleries Ltd, 19 East 53rd Street, New York.  (1937 exhibition.)


William Ruscoe Porcelain Figure ‘Hyde Park’, 1930s, hand rolled clay courting couple sitting on a bench, impressed oval mark, Wm, Ruscoe, England, incised script, Hyde Park, 3½”.       

                               RPW00260                                                     Enquire

 

Provenance

Property from The Personal Collection of Shirley Temple Black.  Purchased from the Saint James Galleries Ltd, 19 East 53rd Street, New York.  (1937 exhibition.)


William Ruscoe Porcelain Group ‘Beer’, 1930s, hand rolled clay figure of a two men drinking at a table, impressed oval mark, Wm, Ruscoe, England, script Beer, 3¾“.    

                           RPW00259                                                  Enquire

 

Provenance

Property from The Personal Collection of Shirley Temple Black.  Purchased from the Saint James Galleries Ltd, 19 East 53rd Street, New York.  (1937 exhibition.)

 


William Ruscoe Porcelain Figure ‘Victorian’, 1930s, hand rolled clay figure of a gentleman in a top hot, impressed oval mark, Wm, Ruscoe, England, script, Victorian, 5“.    

                                RPW00257                                                          Enquire

 

Provenance

Property from The Personal Collection of Shirley Temple Black.  Purchased from the Saint James Galleries Ltd, 19 East 53rd Street, New York.  (1937 exhibition.)